Melting of Polar Ice Caps | Consequences of melting Ice

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Melting of Polar Ice Caps

 

Melting of Polar Ice Caps 

Greenland ice caps are melting six times faster than in the 1990s. The analysis was conducted by a team of 89 scientists from 50 international organizations, and matched the results of 26 ice melt surveys, including 11 collected from satellite explorations. 

According to the study, 2019 has everything to confirm itself as the record year for ice loss in Greenland and Antarctica, where the event is occurring at its worst in relation to the level of global warming. was underlined. IPCC (Intergovernmental Group on Climate Change). Without rapid cuts in carbon emissions, the risk of rising sea levels will become increasingly real. 

According to the IPCC, if the sea level rise by 2100 should have been 53 cm before these latest figures, another 17 cm could be added to these now. And about a third of the total sea level rise will come from the loss of ice in Greenland and Antarctica. 

Before 2019, the year 2010 was the record year for the melting of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets after a series of very hot summers. Between 2000 and 2010, 475 billion tons of ice melted, which is six times more than the 81 billion tons annually in the 1990s. In total, the two polar ice caps lost 6.4 tons of ice between 1992 and 2017, 60% of which is in Greenland. 

Melting of Polar Ice Caps, Consequences of melting Ice

What is the main reason for the melting of glaciers? 

Almost all of the loss of Antarctic ice and half of Greenland is due to warming oceans that have melted glaciers flowing from the polar cap. The melting of ice accelerates, and more icebergs are dumped into the ocean, and so sea level rises. 

The joint analysis was carried out by a team of 89 scientists from 50 international organizations, who analyzed the results of 26 different surveys. The research focused on data from 11 satellite missions that tracked changes in the volume, flow velocity and mass of ice sheets. 

Melting of Polar Ice Caps, Consequences of melting Ice

Consequences of melting ice 

According to the study – according to reviews from the IPCC itself – the intensity of melting ice at the poles could lead to sea level rise, exposing 400 million people to coastal flooding. And this within a few decades. 

The new analysis updates and adds to the data on existing ice mass, predicting that 2020 will mark a new negative record on this issue. End-of-sea ice has, in fact, increased from 81 billion tonnes per year in the 1990s to 475 in 2018, the results of which we are already able to touch on Italian coasts today. 

The previous negative record was in 2010 at the end of a cycle of very hot summers.  But last year’s Arctic heat wave reflects the worst.  Overall, the two polar ice caps lost 6.4 billion tons of ice between 1992 and 2017, with the biggest loss being Greenland, accounting for 60% of the total. 

 

[Melting of Polar Ice Caps | Consequences of melting Ice]

 

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